Tag Archives: evs

Text Messaging in Higher Education – Project 140

At the UK Centre for Bioscience Reps forum I presented a poster on our use of text messaging with first year students as a means of  in-class electronic voting, for student to student communication and for staff to student communication.  The same poster was also presented at the University of Ulster’s Centre for Higher Education Practice (CHEP) inaugural “Festival of Innovative Practice” back in June.  A copy of the poster is provided below.

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Should students be encouraged to use their mobile phones in class for learning purposes?

Today I was taking part in the University of Ulster’s Centre for Higher Education Practice Festival of Innovation Practice. I was presenting our work on text messaging with students and as part of the presentation asked delegates to vote (by text message) on the following statement:

Students should be encouraged to use their mobile phones in class for learning purposes

Possible responses were:

CHEPA – Strongly Agree
CHEPB – Agree
CHEPC – Disagree
CHEPD – Strongly Disagree


The responses (n = 13), as shown in the pie chart above, were predominantly in agreement with the statement though concern was voiced that the system could be open to abuse.

Students using mobiles in class both for voting and for asking questions of the lecturer (especially in large groups) has some attractive advantages though the approach should be carefully considered and tailored to the individual circumstance.

I would be interested to hear the views of colleagues who have employed text messaging in education. When does it work best? When not?

Many thanks to all who contributed votes and / or comments today!

Festival of Innovative Practice 2010

Today I will be at the University of Ulster’s Centre for Higher Education Practice (CHEP) inaugural “Festival of Innovative Practice”. The event website states the following:

“The purpose of this event is to showcase and celebrate the wide range of innovative work undertaken by both funded CHEP projects and also through the key CHEP sub-committees during 2009-10. In addition, and importantly, it aims to allow all participants to share and learn from each other’s practice.

The day will involve a keynote presentation by the Centre’s Visiting Professor David Boud and the opportunity to hear snapshots of the projects and visit their posters and stands in an interactive exhibition hall.
Topics range from:

* Technology-enhanced learning.
* Creative approaches to working with students.
* Curricula developments e.g. problem-based learning, work-based learning, PDP, student induction
* Pedagogic research e.g. student attendance”

I will be presenting our work on the use of text messaging as both a communication and voting tool for relatively large year one modules under the “Technology-enhanced learning” theme. The programme for the day is here.

As time permits I will also post a few tweets using the #CHEP10 hashtag.

Time to Vote

Last week I was eavesdropping via Twitter on the #ESTICT (Engaging Students Through In Class Technology) event in Edinburgh on 29th April 2010.

I was impressed with the theme of the event which was electronic voting systems (EVS) particularly because of my own use of text message voting in a large year one lecture this academic year.

Though participating remotely I was able to be involved in some of the voting sessions using the ResponseWare App on my iPod Touch. The process worked extremely smoothly and underlined for me how such technologies could enhance participation and engagement when learners are geographically disparate and unable to vote using the traditional “in class” handset approach.

As learning becomes much more mobile so too must our assessment strategies and strategies for student engagement and participation. This can be achieved through iPhone/IPod Touch Apps and SMS messaging. But how do these compare with the traditional handset in class approach?

It’s time to vote! Let me know your view by commenting below.